Quantum Computing: Atomic Clocks Make for Longer-Lasting Qubits

#1
A decade ago, quantum computing was still something of a parlor game. Quantum-computer advocates could make bold claims about one promising technology or another because no one had yet figured out how to string together more than a handful of quantum bits (qubits).

Times have changed. IBM now has a 50-qubit machine, Intel is at 49 qubits, and Google has developed a 72-qubit device. And in September, Pennsylvania State University researchers announced they’d built the framework for a 125-qubit compute engine.
Source and full article here: https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing...g-atomic-clocks-make-for-longerlasting-qubits
 
#2
I was very excited when I read this news, especially since Penn State University's quantum computer runs on atomic clock - that is, its frequency is measured with aid of atomic electron transition, or put it more simple, it is a transition when electron change energy level within an atom. The only problem is the device is of huge size. Hopefully sometimes soon they will be able to scale it to a size of a normal home device.
 
#5
Google's quantum computer is 100 million times faster than regular modern laptop. This one is even faster, only thing is I'm not sure because this one is 125 qubits, and Google's have 72, but qubits don't linearly scale into processing power, rather exponentially.
 

zoldos

Reality is just perception...
Staff member
#6
I figured a quantum computers would be very very fast. I've seen them featured in movies and TV. But how far away are we from an actual working model than we can sit in front of and use like a PC?
 
#11
Awesome. Can I play Battlefield V on it? hehe
I think it wouldn't matter if you run video games on it (in fact I read somewhere games could be slower on quantum computer), because video games are optimized to work with Boolean logic (which is used by a standard PC). However, if you want to run some fast password cracking algorithm than it should run faster on quantum computer.
 

zoldos

Reality is just perception...
Staff member
#12
Trippy. Okay so if a standard app was "made" to run on a Quantum Computer, then it would like thousands of times faster?
 
#13
Trippy. Okay so if a standard app was "made" to run on a Quantum Computer, then it would like thousands of times faster?
Its not so trippy when you know logic of quantum mechanics and logic of boolean algebra are in essence competely different.

If you have proposition A and proposition B in boolean algebra you can do some operation with them by use of truth functions, ie: "A and B", "A or B", "A xor B", "not A", "not B" and so on. As a result you will get valid logical state. In other words result of operation that works on your proposition is either true or false.

Proposition A: 8 > 5
Proposition B: 7 = 3 +4

A is true, B is also true, so result of operation "A and B" is true. If for B I said "7 = 1 + 4", the result of "A and B" would be false. In a more abstract way its very similar with classical physics. Another thing is reverse must also be true, so "A and B" should always evaluate to the same result as "B and A".

In quantum mechanics these logical operations have no meaning, because it boils down to probability. For example, given that spin of electron can be in either -1 or +1, and suppose in the start of measurement the spin is aligned with x-component and gives +1, you can say:

Proposition A: x-component of spin of an electron is +1.
Proposition B: y-component of spin of an electron is +1.

Lets try "A and B":
After measuring x-component you get +1, then when you measure y-component you get 50% chance to get +1.

Now try reverse condition, ie "B and A", and it should render the same result, but it doesn't:
After measuring y-component you get 50% to get +1, and after that when you measure x-component you get 25% to get +1.

In other words in quantum mechanics "A and B" is not "B and A". Many of boolean logic simply does not hold for quantum mechanics.

So my conclusion is that if the application is made specifically to work with quantum computer it might not work at all with classical PC, and reverse.
 

zoldos

Reality is just perception...
Staff member
#14
specifically to work with quantum computer it might not work at all with classical PC, and reverse.
That's my point. If I had a Quantum Computer I'd simply make apps solely for that.

Oh, how does the Heisenberg Principle play into all of this?